ParLu
WWF Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety
 

Glossary

There is a never-ending debate among actors and stakeholders in the forestry field as to the meaning of various REDD+ technical terms.

Within ParLu we have set out to create a clear and common definition of the most commonly used terms in the field.

This glossary has built on the work of standardized terminology from conservation organizations (CMP,  2007), and has also been sourced from the CCBS SES,  where terms are reached by consensus through a wide range of interests.

Activity

The practical, time-bound actions or set of tasks that the project carries out to reach one or more objectives. (See relationship to strategies below). Activities are roughly synonymous with interventions, responses and measures.

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Approach

Approach can mean two things in this context, it is either the way that REDD+ activities deal with the potential risks and opportunities for the REDD+ project and multiple-beneficiaries or it can also be used as a synonym for ‘strategy’.

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Baseline

This is a term with different meanings in different fields. In carbon accounting, it refers to the projection of emissions reductions in the absence of project activities. In other contexts, the word ‘baseline’ is often used to refer to starting conditions. 

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Impacts

Positive and negative long-term or durable effects resulting from the implementation of a project, whether intended or unintended.

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Issue

A degraded key attribute that are impaired indirectly or directly by human activities and corresponds to the main problems facing the project. Issues are roughly synonymous with “stresses”, “degraded condition” or “symptoms” of a target.

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Monitoring

The periodic collection and evaluation of data relative to stated project goals and objectives. (Many people often also refer to this process as monitoring and evaluation (abbreviated M&E)).

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Monitoring Plan

The plan for monitoring your project. It includes information needs, indicators, and methods, spatial scale and locations, timeframe, and roles and responsibilities for collecting data.

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Multiple benefits

The benefits that arise from REDD+ that are in addition to the contribution to climate change mitigation. Usually these benefits are in the social and environmental domain.

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Program

A group of projects that together and aim to achieve a common broad vision, usually at a larger, national landscape level. This typically refers to national UN-REDD programs.

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Project

A set of actions undertaken by a defined group of practitioners – including managers, researchers, community members, or other stakeholders – to achieve defined goals and objectives. The basic unit of REDD+ activities work. Compare with program.

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REDD+

This is officially defined as “reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks” (UNFCCC Decision 2/CP.13–11). This definition is understood to include planted trees, natural forest restoration, and improved (sustainable) forest management.

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Reference scenario

The expected conditions to be found in the project area, if the project activities are not implemented.

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Safeguards

The concern of issues such as governance, stakeholder participation, the knowledge and rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities, biodiversity, ecosystem services, the risk of reversals and the risk of displacement of emissions, among others. These last two items are connected directly to the effectiveness of REDD+ as a mechanism for mitigating global climate change. But the other safeguards address, in effect, the multiple-benefits of REDD+.

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Stakeholder

Any individual, group, or institution that has a vested interest in the natural resources of the project area and/or that potentially will be affected by project activities and have something to gain or lose if conditions change or stay the same. Stakeholders are all those who need to be considered in achieving project goals and whose participation and support are crucial to its success.

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Standard (for REDD+ activities)

A common set of requirements, rules and/or principles that a forest carbon project should comply with to ensure that the practice of REDD+ activities is providing their contribution to environmental, social and GHG performance. Goal is to address the issues REDD+ projects face, and where the performance of the project action leads to positive social and environmental impacts.

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Strategic Plan

The overall plan for a project. A complete strategic plan includes descriptions of a project’s scope, vision, and targets; an analysis of project situation, an Action Plan, a Monitoring Plan, and an Operational Plan.

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Strategy

A group of actions with a common focus that work together to reduce threats, capitalize on opportunities, or restore natural systems. Strategies include one or more practices and tasks which are designed to achieve specific objectives and goals. A good strategy meets the criteria of being: linked, focused, feasible, and appropriate. Strategies are roughly synonymous with REDD+ national approaches.

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Threat

A human activity that directly or indirectly degrades one or more targets. This is typically tied to one or more stakeholders. See also direct threat and indirect threat.

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